Day 16. Punakha – Paro

Overnight – Como Uma Paro

You are assisted with your check-out of your lodge and driven to Paro. On the way to Paro, you have the option of stopping for a guided visit to Simtokha Dzong. This small fortress was built in 1627 and is one of the oldest in Bhutan. The fortress currently houses the Institute for Language and Culture studies. Upon your arrival near Paro, you are assisted with your check in at your lodge. 

Enjoy lunch and a short break before your next experience.

Mid-afternoon – The valley of Paro contains many amazing attractions, crowned by the awe-inspiring Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest) monastery, which is on your schedule for tomorrow. Proceed on the short drive, or a delightful walk (a little over a mile), to the National Museum of Bhutan, Ta Dzong. Ta Dzong was originally a watchtower built to defend Rinpung Dzong during the local Bhutanese wars of the 17th century. It was inaugurated as Bhutan’s National Museum in 1968. It houses a wealth of artifacts ranging from about 4000 BC to modern times.

After the museum you will walk 5 minutes to the adjacent Rinpung Dzong (Fortress that sits on a Heap of Jewels). Like other Bhutanese Dzong’s, it has a long and fascinating history and is an excellent example of Bhutanese architecture. Along the wooden galleries lining the inner courtyard are fine wall paintings illustrating Buddhist lore. It was built in the 16th century by Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal, the first spiritual and temporal ruler of Bhutan. Currently the dzong houses the monastic body of Paro, the office of the Dzongda (District Administrative Head) and Thrimpon (Judge) of Paro district. Access to the dzong is across a traditional covered cantilever bridge called Nemi Zam. You can choose to either walk or drive back to your wonderful lodge after exploring the Dzong.

You are assisted with your check-out of your lodge and driven to Paro. On the way to Paro, you have the option of stopping for a guided visit to Simtokha Dzong. This small fortress was built in 1627 and is one of the oldest in Bhutan. The fortress currently houses the Institute for Language and Culture studies. Upon your arrival near Paro, you are assisted with your check in at your lodge. 

Enjoy lunch and a short break before your next experience.

Mid-afternoon – The valley of Paro contains many amazing attractions, crowned by the awe-inspiring Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest) monastery, which is on your schedule for tomorrow. Proceed on the short drive, or a delightful walk (a little over a mile), to the National Museum of Bhutan, Ta Dzong. Ta Dzong was originally a watchtower built to defend Rinpung Dzong during the local Bhutanese wars of the 17th century. It was inaugurated as Bhutan’s National Museum in 1968. It houses a wealth of artifacts ranging from about 4000 BC to modern times.

After the museum you will walk 5 minutes to the adjacent Rinpung Dzong (Fortress that sits on a Heap of Jewels). Like other Bhutanese Dzong’s, it has a long and fascinating history and is an excellent example of Bhutanese architecture. Along the wooden galleries lining the inner courtyard are fine wall paintings illustrating Buddhist lore. It was built in the 16th century by Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal, the first spiritual and temporal ruler of Bhutan. Currently the dzong houses the monastic body of Paro, the office of the Dzongda (District Administrative Head) and Thrimpon (Judge) of Paro district. Access to the dzong is across a traditional covered cantilever bridge called Nemi Zam. You can choose to either walk or drive back to your wonderful lodge after exploring the Dzong.

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